Last 13-15 October 2021, the COE-PSP Knowledge Center ran a webinar on Productivity and Quality Management, featuring Engr. Charlie A. Marquez, DAP resource speaker; Dr. Ralph Sherwin A. Corpuz, director of Quality Assurance at the  Technological University of the Philippines; and Dr. Juliet J. Balderas, head of Management Services Department at the Philippine Heart Center (PHC).

To know more about the webinar, click here.


Below is a summary and analysis of the responses gathered from the post-webinar survey, highlighting the discussion on the participant’s demographic profile and the results of the assessment.

Last 13 August 2021, the COE-PSP Knowledge Center ran a webinar on Knowledge Management in the new normal context, featuring Jon Del Rosario, supervising fellow and professor of Knowledge Management and Quality Management of DAP Graduate School of Public and Development Management, and Dr. Enrique Tayag, director of the Department of Health’s Knowledge Management and Information Technology Service.

To know more about the webinar, click here.


Below is a summary and analysis of the responses gathered from the post-webinar survey, highlighting the discussion on the participant’s demographic profile and the results of the knowledge management assessment.

Last 15-17 September 2021, the COE-PSP Knowledge Center ran a webinar on Innovative Thinking for Enhancing Public Sector Productivity, featuring innovation champions, Adrian Ramirez, Leanne Lozanes, Anita S. Gubalane, and Paul Vincent Avecilla.

To know more about the webinar, click here.


Below is a summary and analysis of the responses gathered from the post-webinar survey, highlighting the discussion on the participant’s demographic profile and results of the assessment.

Abstract:

“The productivity figures presented in Public Service Output, Inputs and Productivity: Education (ONS 2009) are best estimates using the most recently available data. Estimates of productivity change need to be interpreted alongside other indicators of inputs, outputs and outcomes. It is unlikely that a single measure of productivity change will ever capture all the costs and benefits of education. The aim of triangulation is to help users understand the productivity estimates by providing additional contextual information, giving a wider picture that has not been shown in the compilation of the education productivity estimates themselves. The Atkinson Review: Final Report – Measurement of Government Output and Productivity for the National Accounts (Atkinson 2005) suggests information on quality of teaching and class size would be useful for helping this process of triangulation, although data may not be suitable for direct inclusion in the National Accounts measure. This evidence is not necessarily expected to corroborate estimates of productivity change, as sources vary in their scale and scope and therefore rarely cover exactly the same thing. For each evidential measure, an indication is given of:

  • the likely degree of influence schools have on each triangulation measure, which is currently not quantified
  • the coherence of changes in each triangulation measure with changes in input, quantity or quality

In the remainder of this article:

section 2 presents a table summarising the triangulation evidence section 3 looks at the quantification of factors affecting children and young people’s outcomes section 4 discusses the scope of wider outcomes for children and young people section 5 presents evidence on the quality of education section 6 highlights evidence on children and young people’s physical, mental and sexual health section 7 looks at evidence on children and young people’s safety section 8 looks at evidence on economic outcomes for children and young people section 9 gives references”

Abstract:

The productivity figures presented in Public Service Output, Inputs and Productivity: Education (ONS 2009) are best estimates using the most recently available data. This supporting article presents further detail on the components of output:

    • Section 2 reports demographic patterns over recent history
    • Section 3 provides extended analyses of quantity by country
    • Section 4 provides extended analyses of quality by country
    • Section 5 provides extended analyses of output by country

Source: Office of National Statistics, United Kingdom

Abstract:

The United Kingdom Centre for the Measurement of Government Activity (UKCeMGA) was set up to provide information on the outputs, inputs and productivity of public services for the whole of the UK, working with government departments and the devolved administrations. This is the 2008-09 Annual Report for the UK Centre for the Measurement of Government Activity (UKCeMGA).

Source: data.gov.uk

Abstract:

The Service Delivery Indicators program is an application of the principles of the 2004 World Development Report Making Services Work for Poor People. The Service Delivery Indicators project is a new Africa-wide initiative that tracks service delivery in education and health across countries and over time. The project collects nationally representative data that focus mainly on performance and quality of service delivery in primary schools and at frontline health facilities. This partnership between the World Bank, the African Development Bank and the African Economic Research Consortium brings together development economists and sector specialists. The objective is to reposition the dialogue on human development in Africa within the context of effectiveness of public spending and accountability for service delivery. Why such an agenda? Accountability for public resources: developing country governments allocate roughly a third of budgets to education and health. Demands for accountability for the efficient use of public resources—from citizens and tax payers in developed or developing countries alike—are gaining in prominence, in part, because of the global economic situation. Accountability depends upon measurement: without consistent and accurate information on the quality of services, it is difficult for citizens or politicians to assess how service providers are performing, to work towards corrective action, and ultimately bring about improvements. There is little robust and representative evidence of what teachers and health workers do during a typical work-day, their levels of ability, knowledge and skills, how teachers perform their teaching activities and how well health workers diagnose and treat their patients.

Source: WorldBank

Abstract:

Rating of countries against a set of 16 criteria grouped in four clusters: economic management, structural policies, policies for social inclusion and equity, and public sector management and institutions.

Source: Worldbank

Abstract:

Quarterly Public Sector Debt (QPSD) database, jointly developed by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, brings together detailed public sector debt data of selected countries. The QPSD database includes country and cross-country tables, and specific public debt components. The data represent the following sectors on an as-available basis: General government; otherwise Central government; otherwise Budgetary central government; Nonfinancial public corporations and Financial public corporations and a table presenting the total public sector debt.

Source: WorldBank

Abstract:

Privatization Database provides information on privatization transactions of at least US$1 million in developing countries from 2000 to 2008. Prior to this effort the most comprehensive information could be found in the World Bank’s Privatization Transactions database, which covered the years 1988 through 1999.

Source: WorldBank